Word Problem Wednesday – Sheela’s Bookmarks

Summer’s here, but you’re missing your math? Don’t despair – we’ve got you covered. Check the site each week for one whopper of a word problem that’s sure to challenge!


This week’s problem comes from Problem Solving Beyond the Classroom: Primary 6 by Bernice Lau Pui Wah, published in 2013 by Marshall Cavendish International (Singapore) Private Limited. 

Sheela plans to make 245 bookmarks to sell at the funfair. Each day she will make 5 fewer bookmarks than the previous day. She plans to complete making the bookmarks in 7 days. How many bookmarks does Sheela plan to make on the first day?

Submit your solutions and we’ll post all interesting strategies next week.


Last week’s problem and solution:

There are 8 people on committee A and 9 people on committee B. If 5 people serve on both committees, how many people serve on only one of the committees?

Whew! How did you do?

Savvy reader Shirley Davis sent in her solution:

Word Problem Wednesday – Committees

Summer’s here, but you’re missing your math? Don’t despair – we’ve got you covered. Check the site each week for one whopper of a word problem that’s sure to challenge!


This week’s problem comes from Brain Maths 2 by Tan Thoo Liang, published in 2007 by Panpac Education Private Limited. (For ages 11 and up)

There are 8 people on committee A and 9 people on committee B. If 5 people serve on both committees, how many people serve on only one of the committees?

Submit your solutions and we’ll post all interesting strategies next week.

 


Last week’s problem and solution:

Two plates and 3 bowls weigh 2 1/5 lbs. Five plates and 6 bowls weigh 4 9/10 lbs. Find the weight of one plate.

Whew! How did you do?

Solutions from our fabulous followers:

Kris Simonson:

Shirley Davis:

 

 

 

 

Word Problem Wednesday – Plates and Bowls

Summer’s here, but you’re missing your math? Don’t despair – we’ve got you covered. Check the site each week for one whopper of a word problem that’s sure to challenge!


This week’s problem comes from Math in Focus Enrichment 4A by Ang Kok Cheng, published in 2015 by Marshall Cavendish International (Singapore) Private Limited.

Two plates and 3 bowls weigh 2 1/5 lbs. Five plates and 6 bowls weigh 4 9/10 lbs. Find the weight of one plate.

Submit your solutions and we’ll post all interesting strategies next week.


Last week’s problem and solution:

A grocer sold a carton of apples to some customers. The first customer tasted one apple and bought half the remaining apples. The second and third customers did the same. The fourth customer also tasted one apple and bought the remaining 23 apples. How many apples were there in the carton at first?

Whew! How did you do?

Once again, reader Shirley Davis submitted a solution:

Word Problem Wednesday – Apples

Summer’s here, but you’re missing your math? Don’t despair – we’ve got you covered. Check the site each week for one whopper of a word problem that’s sure to challenge!


This week’s problem comes from Primary Mathematics Intensive Practice 4A, published in 2004 by SingaporeMath.com

A grocer sold a carton of apples to some customers. The first customer tasted one apple and bought half the remaining apples. The second and third customers did the same. The fourth customer also tasted one apple and bought the remaining 23 apples. How many apples were there in the carton at first?

Submit your solutions and we’ll post all interesting strategies next week.


Last week’s problem and solution:

There are 3/5 as many cows as sheep on a farm. If there are 240 cows and sheep altogether, how many more sheep than cows are there?

Whew! How did you do?

Once again, astute reader Shirly Davis sent in a solution:

 

Word Problem Wednesday – Cows and Sheep

Summer’s here, but you’re missing your math? Don’t despair – we’ve got you covered. Check the site each week for one whopper of a word problem that’s sure to challenge!


This week’s problem comes from an oldie, but goodie: Mathematics Topical Worksheets 6A by Lawrence Loh, published in 2001 by SNP Education Pte Ltd.

There are 3/5 as many cows as sheep on a farm. If there are 240 cows and sheep altogether, how many more sheep than cows are there?

Submit your solutions and we’ll post all interesting strategies next week.


Last week’s problem and solution:

Rae bought 100 oranges and 46 apples. After she used an equal number of oranges and apples for making fruit juice. The ratio of her remaining oranges to apples became 5:2. Find the total number of oranges and apples she used.

Whew! How did you do?

Here’s a solution sent in by reader Shirley Davis: