Word Problem Wednesday – Tanks

Word Problem Wednesday was such a hit, we’re going to continue through the year!

This problem comes from Problem Solving Beyond the Classroom Primary 3 by Bernice Lau Pui Wah, published in 2013 by Marshall Cavendish International (Singapore) Private Limited. 

Tank A has a capacity of 1 l 820 ml. Tank B has a capacity of 860 ml less than that of Tank A but twice as much as Tank C. Find the Capacity of Tank C.

Submit your solutions and we’ll post all interesting strategies.


Last month’s problem came from Primary Mathematics Intensive Practice 6A published in 2004 by SingaporeMath.com Inc.

There were 75% more adult passengers than children on a bus.  After 1/2 of the children had gotten off at a bus stop, there were _______% more adults than children left on the bus.

How did you do?

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Word Problem Wednesday – Cards

Summer’s here, but you’re missing your math? Don’t despair – we’ve got you covered. Check the site each week for one whopper of a word problem that’s sure to challenge!


Our final problem of the summer comes from Primary Mathematics Challenging Word Problems 6 by Joseph D. Lee, published in 2006 by Panpac Education Private Limited. 

The number of Jason’s cards and the number of Frederick’s cards are in the ratio of 5:8. The number of Frederick’s cards and the number of Steven’s cards are in the ratio of 4:3. If Jason has 18 fewer cards than Frederick, how many cards does Steven have?

Submit your solutions and we’ll post all interesting strategies next week.


Last week’s problem and solution:

Mr. Seow borrowed a certain amount from a bank, which charged him an interest of 3.5% per year. If he owed the bank $4347 at the end of the year, how much did he borrow from the bank?

Whew! How did you do?

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Word Problem Wednesday – Mr. Seow

Summer’s here, but you’re missing your math? Don’t despair – we’ve got you covered. Check the site each week for one whopper of a word problem that’s sure to challenge!


This week’s problem comes from Visible Thinking in Mathematics 5B by Ammiel Wan and Chelsia Loh, published in 2011 by Marshall Cavendish International (Singapore) Private Limited. 

Mr. Seow borrowed a certain amount from a bank, which charged him an interest of 3.5% per year. If he owed the bank $4347 at the end of the year, how much did he borrow from the bank?

Submit your solutions and we’ll post all interesting strategies next week.


Last week’s problem and solution:

Cynthia had $16.75. She withdrew more cash from an ATM before shopping. After spending $17.50 on a box of cookies and $23.40 on a box of chocolates, she had $35.85 left. How much money did she withdraw from the ATM?

Whew! How did you do?

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Throwback Thursday – It can’t all be Singapore Math…

Over the summer, we thought it would be fun to run some of the most popular posts from the past. Here’s a look at some misconceptions around Singapore Math and Common Core Standards. When I re-read a post from the past I always take away something different because I am in a different place with my own experience. Perhaps you are as well!


It can’t all be Singapore Math…

Originally published 12/29/2014

This tweet posted by the National Council on Teacher Quality (@NCTQ) caught my eye:

NCTQ_Tweet

Now, I’ve heard decomposing called “branching” but can’t remember ever seeing this in a Singapore textbook. Where did this problem come from?

It’s nice that NCTQ recognizes Singapore’s Math as “tops in the world.” But it’s discouraging to see methods and terminology that are not a part of the Singapore curriculum attributed to it. Especially in the context of the nasty debate about CCSS. And especially since Singapore’s math curriculum–with its rigor, coherence, and focus–is often cited as a basis for more rigorous standards, including CCSS.

The problem posted is based on the concept of “Number Bonds,” which calls for students to decompose numbers (this is the term used in Singapore and in all major Singapore Math® textbooks distributed in the U.S.). Below, I’ve posted some examples of how this concept is presented in Singapore Math® series available in both the U.S. and Singapore.

This matter points to my BIG concern: As publishers and others adapt Singapore’s Math for the American market, new approaches creep in. These often are not based on the curriculum that helped Singapore’s students go from mediocre to best in the world in a dozen years. I’ve written about this in my comparison of Singapore math textbook series available in the United States.

So my plea to NCTQ: please use examples from an actual Singapore mathematics text when citing the components that make it so successful. And feel free to ask if I can help you find those examples.

Number Bonds problems in Singapore Math® textbooks

Here are some materials covering Number Bonds and “decomposing” numbers from actual Singapore textbooks:

From My Pals are Here, the most-used materials in Singapore:

MPAH 3A Mental Addition

From the U.S. Edition of Primary Mathematics, available in North America since 2003:

PM US 3A Mental Addition

From the Common Core Edition of Primary Mathematics, released in the U.S. market in 2014:

PM CC 3A Mental Addition_0001

And finally, from Math in Focus:

MiF_3a_mental_math

 

UPDATE:

Ugh! One more similar tweet from NCTQ.

NCTQ_tweet_#2

 

 

 

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Word Problem Wednesday – Cynthia’s Money

Summer’s here, but you’re missing your math? Don’t despair – we’ve got you covered. Check the site each week for one whopper of a word problem that’s sure to challenge!


This week’s problem comes from Primary Mathematics Challenging Word Problems 3, published in 2011 by Marshall Cavendish International (Singapore) Private Limited. 

Cynthia had $16.75. She withdrew more cash from an ATM before shopping. After spending $17.50 on a box of cookies and $23.40 on a box of chocolates, she had $35.85 left. How much money did she withdraw from the ATM?

Submit your solutions and we’ll post all interesting strategies next week.


Last week’s problem and solution:
Sheela plans to make 245 bookmarks to sell at the funfair. Each day she will make 5 fewer bookmarks than the previous day. She plans to complete making the bookmarks in 7 days. How many bookmarks does Sheela plan to make on the first day?

Whew! How did you do?

 

Our solution from Shirley Davis!

 

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